“I am a fan of your future.”

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to spend time with some teachers and coaches from my high school years.  These reunions were so special.  These five men and women played a huge role in shaping me and making me the woman I am today.  Each of them not only shared their talents and abilities with their students, they shared themselves.  They cared about us and invested themselves in us.  Although more than 30 years had passed since I had seen most of them, the connection that we shared hadn’t changed.   I was again inspired just by being with them.

Throughout my lifetime, God has blessed me with some of His best people to guide, mentor and coach me.  I am so grateful for each and every one of them.  While I just had the opportunity to spend time with five of them, there have been many, many others.  (You all know who you are.)  And I am so thankful that God continues to put mentors in my life.  Each one of them is a precious gift to me.

If any of you are a Pixar fan like I am, perhaps you saw “Cars 3,” which came out last year.  I went to see it simply because I was a fan of the first two installments of the series, but I was pleasantly surprised, as the movie unfolded, that it’s theme was about the power of mentoring.

God always finds interesting ways of speaking to me and one of His ways is through movies.  Cars 3 was no exception.  He showed me things through that movie that reminded me of the powerful gift that mentoring is.  Here are just a few highlights of what He showed me.

Good mentors believe in you.lightning drives into racing center

When Lightning McQueen is faced with the reality that his racing abilities can’t compete with younger, faster race cars he has a choice to make.  He can either give up racing or change the way he trains.  He decides to stay in the game and seek out a new way to become a better racer.  His sponsors recognize that they do not have the ability to take him to the next level, so they sell their company, Rust-eze, to someone who has greater resources and can make Lightning a faster race car.  When Lightning arrives at his new training center, the foyer of this state-of-the-art facility is essentially a museum dedicated to his career.  His number, 95, stands two stories high at the entrance.  He is awestruck.

As I watched this scene unfold the words that ran through my mind were, “They believe in him!”  Imagine feeling like you were washed up, a loser, barely hanging on to the only thing you know how to do and arriving at a place of last resort – a place where you would either make it or break it.  The last thing you would expect would be a foyer set up as a shrine in your honor.

Lightning McQueen, after seeing this vast display of memorabilia from his career says, “Wow.  You really are a fan.”  To which his new sponsor replies, “I am a fan of your future.”

That is what mentors are.  They don’t see our failures, they see our future.  They believe in us in spite of what our “stats” look like and in spite of our “win/lose” column.  They see us.  They see us for who we are and who we can become.  They see our potential.  They see in us what we cannot see in ourselves.  That has definitely been my experience.    And no gift can be greater than someone believing in you.

SIDE NOTE AND SPOILER ALERT:  Lightning’s new sponsor turns out to be somewhat of a villain in the story and not a mentor to him at all.  But more on true mentorship in a moment.  Read on.

Good mentors have good mentors. smokey's garage cars 3

Lightning McQueen’s mentor, Doc Hudson (The Fabulous Hudson Hornet) passed away years earlier.  But, we learn in Cars 3, that Doc Hudson himself had a mentor named, Smokey.  As Lightning longs for direction and guidance he turns to the only one who might be able to guide him like his mentor would.  He ventures out and ultimately finds his mentor’s mentor, Smokey.

I can only assume that the mentors in my life had significant people in their lives who mentored them along the way.  Their willingness to give of themselves is evidence to me that they have received from the generous love and outpouring of others.

As God gives me the opportunity to mentor others I do so with passion.  I want to give to others what I have been given.  I want to do my mentors proud by giving others what I have received.

The mentoring relationship is unique in that it’s not designed to be reciprocal.  It’s designed to be perpetual.  My mentors don’t want to receive from me what they have given me, just as I don’t want to receive from those I mentor.  But what I do hope for my mentees, is that they get the opportunity to pour into another’s life.  Because as great as it is to receive, it is even greater to give back.

Which brings me to my favorite scene in Cars 3.

There is great value for both mentor and mentee in a mentoring relationship.

 

In my favorite scene, Lightning talks to Smokey about how bitter his mentor, Doc Hudson, seemed to be after his racing days were over.  Lightning’s impression of Doc was that because Doc was no longer able to race he was never really happy again.  Then Smokey takes Lightning to his garage.  On the way, he too admits that Doc was bitter after being forced to give up racing.  He shares that the two of them hadn’t been in touch for many years.  But then, something changed in Doc’s life.  Smokey started getting letters from Doc and the two reconnected.  As Smokey opens the door to his garage, Lightning sees the letters that Doc shared with Smokey posted on the wall.  Every one of them was a newspaper clipping or a photo of Lightning.  Then Smokey says to Lightning,

“Racing wasn’t the best part of Doc’s life, you were.”

Feel the power in that statement.  A mentee struggling to compete, doing everything he can to stay in the game, hoping beyond hope that he can still somehow make his mentor proud, and then he hears those words.  He was the best part of his mentor’s life.

There is great value in the mentoring relationship for both mentor and mentee.  Mentoring may not be reciprocal in the sense that we receive exactly what we give out. But, mentors do receive!  This is a perfect example of that.

When we’re young it seems that life is all about winning and losing.  It’s about our “stats” and what we accomplish. But what we get from our mentors, from those who believe in us and who we are as people, is the understanding that life is not about our performance or our abilities, our successes or our failures. It’s about our connection to others.  It’s about the value we have and can give to others, about how we can invest in them, believe in them, and remind them of their own value and worth.  Doc’s ability to give of himself to Lightning changed his bitter feelings about his own career and focused his life and his heart on what was important, his relationship with Lightning.

This is what we pass along to those we mentor:   That our true value is in who we are and our goal is to use that value to help others find theirs.

clippings doc hudsonOne of the things I love about this scene, is it’s contrast to the moment when Lightning enters his sponsor’s training facility.  Both moments are awe inspiring for Lightning.  Both of them show Lightning his value and importance.  But only one is truly genuine, deep, and based on a personal investment rather than a monetary one.  Doc was so proud of being connected to Lightning that he couldn’t help but share it with the one who had poured so much into him.  And Smokey was so proud of being connected to Doc, he couldn’t help but honor the relationship he got to see between Doc and Lightning by posting those clippings and articles in a place he would see them every day.  The glitzy, jaw-droppingly beautiful museum in the foyer of the training facility was no comparison to sacrificial, uncompromising, unconditional love that was displayed in newspaper clippings and faded photographs in that old garage. 

The best part of my life is not about what I have accomplished or not accomplished.  The best part of my life are the people God has connected me to.  He has connected me to others through my successes and through my failures.  Those are the means through which He has made some of the most important connections in my life possible.  And as I get older, I see more and more of the value I possess – not for myself, but to invest in the lives of others.  I want others to know their value so they too may pass it on to others. 

I am eternally grateful for the mentors in my life, the five people in the pictures above and the countless others who have poured into me.  Thank you.  You believed in me.  You saw and still see in me what I cannot see in myself.  You have given of yourselves and invested in me time, love, and attention so that I will be a better me.  Your gifts to me are priceless and I in turn am investing what I have into others so that your legacy lives on.  Thank you.  May God bless you as He has blessed me through you.

Lord, thank you for wiring all of us for connection.  Thank you for showing us the value of mentoring through the life and ministry of Your Son and through the gift of Your Spirit that lives in us and connects us as followers of You.  Father, you specifically chose people to serve as mentors to me.  Thank you for knowing who would be the perfect fit.  Bless them as you have blessed me through them.  And thank you for the opportunities you give me to mentor others.  May I be as faithful as those who have poured into me and may You be glorified through every relationship.  In Jesus’ most precious name, amen.

“Go Back” or “Follow Me” – Which Do You Choose?

CHILD-BEAUTY_141615245694I don’t watch the show but it happened to come on after another program I do watch.  I’ll be honest, it was sort of like watching a train wreck.  As horrified as I was I just couldn’t seem to make myself turn the channel.  It was the reality show about young children who compete in beauty pageants.  Not usually my kind of TV show, but on this day I sat and watched the whole hour.  Here’s what had me hooked…  In this particular episode (not pictured), they introduced a young woman, I believe she was in her early 20’s.  She was initially introduced as one of the coaches or advisers for one of the young contestants.  They showed her giving instructions to the little girl on how to walk and how to perform.  However it wasn’t long into the episode that they revealed that this coach was also a competitor.  This particular contest was very unusual in that it had no upper age limit.  So, having grown up in the child pageant world, this young woman entered as a contestant as well as a coach.

At one point they interviewed this young woman’s mother.  She said something to the effect of, “I had hoped by this point in her life we would be looking at entering her children into these contests, not her.  But, oh well… this is where we’re at.”  (The young woman was not married and did not have any children.)

The show ends with the suspenseful crowning of the winners in multiple categories. And who is crowned “Best Overall?”  …of course it was this young woman.  She was the only competitor over the age of 12 and yet she proudly stood up on the stage to receive her crown.  Next to her stood all the runners up.  She towered over all of them by more than a foot.  It was so sad, such a pathetic sight.  This woman’s potential was far beyond a children’s beauty pageant but she didn’t see it.  She went back to what she knew, what was comfortable to her.  I can only assume she was afraid to step out into the life and purpose that God had for her to live.  I was embarrassed for her to be so proud to receive that crown.  It was worthless and meaningless compared to what she had to gain by stepping out into her life.

I recently read John 21.  In that chapter we see someone else who went back to what he knew, to the life that was comfortable, not seeing his full potential.  That someone is Peter.  Yes, the same Peter who walked on water.  The same Peter who confessed that Jesus was Lord and Savior before any of his fellow disciples had the courage to do so.  The same Peter that said he would never leave Jesus’ side – he would always defend him.  Enter, Peter’s failure.  It was right after that bold statement of Peter that he was put to the test and he failed.  He denied ever knowing Jesus!  And he was heartbroken.  He had blown it – big time.

It’s in John 21 where we see the impact that Peter’s failure had on him.  He’s back in the fishing boat.  He’s not spreading the news of Jesus’ resurrection.  He’s not telling about all the miracles he witnessed.  He went back to what he knew.  He went back to his old life as a fisherman.  I can only imagine the heartbreak and turmoil swirling in his soul that caused him to go back to that life.  Surely he must have thought there would be no use for him in God’s kingdom.

While he’s in that boat, no doubt drowning in his sea of self-deprecation, failure, and woe Someone calls to him from the shore, “Have you caught any fish?”  Peter has to admit that even at fishing he’s a failure!  “No,” he replies.  Then the One on the shore says, “Put your nets on the other side of the boat.”  As Peter and his fellow fisherman do so, their nets become full of fish.  John then turns to Peter and says, “That’s the Lord!”  Peter wastes no time with the fish.  He jumps in the water and swims to shore to be with his Savior.

Once on the shore, Jesus has an amazing interchange with Peter.  Three times He asks him, “Do you love me?”  Three times… the same amount of times that Peter had denied Him.  He graciously gave Peter the opportunity to be restored.  He knew Peter’s sin, but He also knew Peter’s heart.  And with each answer that Peter gave, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you,” Jesus commissioned him to be the rock upon which His church would be built.  He did not have to go back to fishing.  He had a purpose.  He had a role in the kingdom of God.  All he had to do was follow Jesus.

It’s the end of this chapter that I love the most.  After Jesus’ declaration of Peter’s purpose, Peter turns and sees John walking behind them.  He asks Jesus, “What about him?”  Jesus basically tells Peter, it’s none of your business what I do with John, we’re talking about you right now.  I used to think that this was an indication of Peter’s competitiveness.  That he was wanting to know what Jesus was going to call John to do in comparison with what He had called Peter to do.  But recently I had another take.  John was known as “the disciple Jesus loved most.”  Granted, John gave himself that title throughout his book, but scholars agree he was very close to Jesus.  He was the one reclining with him, leaning up against his chest on the night of the last supper.  They were close.  I now wonder if Peter was asking about John because he know how much the Lord loved John.  In other words, was Peter asking, “Are you sure you want me to do this?  I know how much you love him and he didn’t screw up?”  Either way Jesus’ response to Peter was – “Follow Me.”

I guess I’ll have to ask Peter in heaven what he meant with his question to Jesus.  But in the meantime I identify so much with his failure and with his turmoil.  I understand his desire to want to go back to fishing.  I get what that must have felt like to think, “I’m out.  He’s going to use someone else.”  BUT…once we know that we are called by God for a definite purpose – even if we don’t know exactly what it is yet – we cannot go back.  We cannot stand on a stage amongst children proudly accepting our worthless crown when our Savior is beckoning us to “Follow HIM!”  We can’t go back to our former lives as fisherman barely eking out an existence when the God of the universe is calling us to join with Him in the furtherance of His kingdom.

Lord, forgive me for the times I have gotten caught up in my own failures.  Give me the courage to take the steps I need to take to follow you rather than going back to what is comfortable for me or what may feel safe to me.  You are my comfort.  You are my safety.  I want what you want for me, Lord.  Give me the courage of your Holy Spirit to follow you.  Thank you Jesus, for the example of Peter and for loving us always even when we fail.  I love you, Lord!  In your most precious name, amen.